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TGIF Archive


Speaker

Inteak, Donghui Wu, Zhihu Qu and Camilla

Time

1:00 PM, Friday,  January 20th, 2017

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title TGIF Specil Meeting-sharing oversea business trip experience


Speaker

Yi Qian & Youjun Chu

Time

3:00 PM, Friday,  January 6th, 2017

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title TGIF Specil Meeting-sharing oversea business trip experience


Speaker

Peixiang Ma

Time

4:00 PM, Friday,  December 16th, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title From atoms to invisible states: probing protein conformation with NMR

Abstract


Characterization of the mechanisms by which proteins fold into their native conformations is important not only for protein structure prediction and design but also because protein misfolding intermediates may play critical roles in fibril formation. In practice, the study of folding pathways is complicated by the fact that for the most part intermediates are low-populated and short-lived so that biophysical studies are difficult. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is the only method that allows to provide the protein dynamic information at atomic level.
Here we will introduce some recent NMR methodological advances, which facilitates the research of protein-drug interaction, huge protein complex (ca. mega-Dalton) protein characterization, relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy foratomic kinetic and thermodynamic description of proteins on the timescalefrom nano-seconds to mille-seconds, which is invisible in other biophysical methods.
Sponsor


Speaker

Tianlei Ying

Time

3:00 PM, Friday,  November 25th, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title The big and the small: Antibody-based therapeutics for the treatment of infectious diseases

Abstract


Therapeutic modalities based on monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have shown clinical success in the treatment of many diseases. By using an extraordinarily large human antibody library and in vitro display technologies we have identified potent neutralizing mAbs against emerging infectious diseases and cancer. Some of these mAbs have been licensed to top biopharmaceutical companies and are expected to move into the clinic shortly. We have also been working on the development of small-sized and long-acting novel antibody constructs. The purpose of this study is to overcome the fundamental limitations for the use of full-length mAbs as cancer therapeutics-- their high production cost, poor penetration into solid tumors, and poor or absent binding to some sterically restricted epitopes.
Sponsor


Speaker

Wei Zhang

Time

3:00 PM, Friday, October 14th, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title Developing a toolbox for enzyme-mediated bioconjugation

Abstract


Bioconjugation, the covalent modification of biomolecules, has gained great attention from both biologists and chemists. Among various methodologies for bioconjugate synthesis, enzme-mediated method, especially peptide ligase-mediated bioconjugation, has been widely used due to the remarkable site-selectivity and mild reaction condition affected by the nature of enzyme.
We have developed a simple high-throughput substrate profiling method to reveal the substrate specificity of a peptide ligase. A small library targeting the LPXTG motif recognized by sortase A from Staphylococcus aureus (saSrtA) was generated and screened against proteins carrying N-terminal glycine. Using this method, in one week, we confirmed all currently known substrates of the enzyme, and moreover identified some previously unknown substrates of the enzyme. The method provides an easy, fast and highly-sensitive method to determine substrate profile of a peptide ligase in a high-throughput fashion.
Sponsor


Speaker

Yi Qian

Time

3:00 PM, Friday,September 23rd, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title ACBD3 is required for KDEL receptor retention at cis-Golgi

Abstract


KDELR1 (KDEL receptor 1), which is related to the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, mainly localizes in the Golgi apparatus. It recognizes and binds the KDEL signal at the C-terminal end of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins that have leaked to the Golgi, and transports them back to the ER. We found that KDELR1 does not contain a Golgi localization signal. Instead, it binds a Golgi structure protein acyl-coA binding domain containing 3 (ACBD3) to stay in the Golgi. When ACBD3 was knocked-down or knocked-out in cells, KDELR1 was mislocalized to the ER and its function in retrograde transport was disrupted.
Sponsor


Speaker

Professor Lucia Regolin

Time

3:00 PM, Friday,July 15th, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title NUMBER SPACE MAPPING IN THE NEWBORN CHICK

Abstract


In the last decade evidence has been accumulating in support of the existence of a “sense for number” and even some “mathematical cognition” in a variety of animal species, suggesting the presence of a continuous and analogical nonverbal representation of numerical magnitudes. To start with, I will review the main studies, with particular reference to those that were carried out in my laboratory. A peculiar feature of number representation in our species is the left-to-right orientation of the so called “mental number line” (MNL) which could be modulated or even entirely produced by cultural factors. Recent developmental studies show that a spatialnumerical association does exist before mathematics and linguistic education. Evidence coming from the study of other species are now tightly watched, as they may cast light on the origin of the human MNL. The model species which has provided insightful data with this regards is the day-old domestic chicken. Results from our recent studies indicate that a disposition to map numerical magnitudes onto a left-to-rightoriented MNL exists independently of cultural factors, and can be observed in animals with very little non-symbolic numerical experience, supporting a biological foundation of such orientation. This paves the way to the investigation of the neurobiological and genetic basis of this phenomenon.
Sponsor


Speaker

Sanhong Liu

Time

3:00 PM, Friday,July 1st, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title A microRNA/NFκB/STAT3 feedback loop in human colorectal cancer

Abstract


Constitutive activation of NFκB and STAT3 plays a key role in controlling the development and progression of human colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the activation mechanisms still remain to be elucidated. We discovered that miR-221 and miR-222 positively regulated both NFκB and STAT3 activities, which in return induced miR-221/222 expression, creating a positive feedback loop in human CRCs. These findings defined a novel mechanism underlying constitutive activation of NFκB and STAT3 pathways in human CRCs, revealing miR-221/222 served as novel potential therapeutic targets for CRCs.
Sponsor


Speaker

Tong Qiang

Time

10:00 AM, Friday, June 24th, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title A Tale of Two Sirtuins in Metabolic Regulation and Aging

Abstract


The caloric restriction extends animal life span and reduces the onset of obesity, diabetes, cancer, neurodegeneration and cardiovascular diseases. The study of the molecular mechanism of caloric restriction may lead to pharmaceutical treatments that may mimic caloric restriction’s beneficial effects. Sir2 gene, which encodes a NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase, was reported to mediate the effect of caloric restriction in yeast. We have demonstrated that the expressions of two of the seven mammalian Sir2 homologues, SIRT2 and SIRT3, are up-regulated in response to dietary restriction, cold exposure and oxidative stress. We have illustrated the molecular mechanism of SIRT2’s action in oxidative stress resistance and the inhibition of adipocyte formation. We have also shown how SIRT3 activates adaptive thermogenesis program in brown adipose tissue and how SIRT3 regulates glucose disposal and fat oxidation in skeletal muscle. To understand the underlying molecular mechanisms, we have identified several substrate proteins for SIRT2 and SIRT3. Another research direction we take is to study the development of adipose tissue and its changes during obesity. By investigating how mature adipocytes are derived from multi-potent precursor cells, we can gain insight into obesity prevention. In addition, by studying how factors produced by adipocytes and adipose tissue influence whole body metabolism, we may learn how obesity causes insulin resistance and subsequent type-2 diabetes.


Speaker

Xuekai Zhu

Time

3:00 PM, Friday, June 17th, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title Targeting patient-derived glioblastoma stem cells by CD133-specific CAR T cells

Abstract


T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) hold great promise for cancer patients as good clinical results released from the treatment of hematological malignancies. The AC133 epitope of CD133 is a cancer stem cell (CSC) marker for many tumor entities, including the highly malignant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). We have developed an AC133-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and show that AC133-CAR T cells kill AC133+ GBM stem cells (GBM-SCs) both in vitro and in an orthotopic tumor model in vivo. However, the efficacy of CAR T cells for solid tumors treatment remains disappointed with few response in the clinical trials. Currently we are trying to improve the function of CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment based on the knowledge what we have learnt from the success of checkpoint blockade therapy.


Speaker

Bei Yang

Time

3:00 PM, Friday, June 3rd, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title A brief introduction of HDX-MS

Abstract


Hydrogen Deuterium Exchange coupled Mass Spectrometry (HDX-MS) measures the hydrogen to deuterium exchange rate of labile backbone hydrogens in amino acids. As the deuterium incorporation rates of amino acids correlates well with their spatial settings, HDX-MS is frequently used to monitor the conformational changes of targetproteins, and to investigate protein-protein or protein-ligand (drug) interactions.
Sponsor


Speaker

Camilla Luni

Time

3:00 PM, Friday,May 13th, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title Microfluidics broadens the route to pluripotency

Abstract


The efficiency of reprogramming human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can be dramatically improved in a microfluidic environment. Microliter-volume confinement results in a 50-fold increase in efficiency over traditional reprogramming by delivery of synthetic mRNAs encoding transcription factors. The high quality and purity of the resulting hiPSCs allow direct differentiation into functional hepatocyte- and cardiomyocyte-like cells in the same platform without additional expansion.
Sponsor


Speaker

Donghui Wu

Time

3:00 PM, Friday, April 29th, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title Cytokine family based therapeutic antibody development

Abstract


Cytokines are a class of low-molecular-weight regulatory proteins that are mainly secreted from immune systems. They are important effector molecules tomaintain the homeostasis of immune system, to recognize and eradicate foreign pathogens such as bacteria, fungi and viruses. Imbalance of cytokines is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer and auto-immune disease. Given the importance of its pathological roles in related diseases, this family has attracted extensive attentions worldwide as a potential antibody drug target.Here I give examples of cytokines that our lab is focusing on for potentially therapeutic antibody development.


Speaker

Sheng Li

Time

3:00 PM, Friday, April 15th, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd
Title A phosphatase and its friends

Abstract


Protein tyrosine phosphorylation, which is precisely balanced by protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) and phosphatases (PTPs), plays a critical regulatory role in most aspects of cell functions. Here we present a crystal structure of PTPN12 with the catalytic cysteine231 in dual conformations: a free form and a phosphate bound one. Combining the biochemical and MD data, we provide insights into the reaction mechanism of the PTP family.


Speaker

Zhihu Qu

Time

3:00 PM, Friday, April 1st, 2016

Venue Students' Hall, 3rd Floor, Building 6, No.99 Haike Rd

Title

Selection of functional antibody targeting ion channels

Abstract


Designing and establishing effective screening methods in cells and phages provide a reliable technology to identify novel antibodies with specific function and biological activities from the available high diversity (1011) combinatorial single chain Fv antibody library. Here we will share our successful screening experience for selection of human functional antibodies against ion channel (Connexin26 and ASIC1) using the combinatorial library approach, namely, the recombination / selection of a natural human repertoire using the principle of evolution.


Speaker

Yan Nie

Time 10:30 AM, Friday, March 18th, 2016
Venue 308 Classroom, Teaching Center, 100 Haike Rd

Title

Versatile Multiexpression Technologies for Complex Protein Biologics

Abstract


To streamline the recombinant production of multiprotein complexes for basic research and translational medicine, an array of advanced and automatable expression systems (Multiexpression Technologies) have been developed for E. coli, insect and mammalian cells. Those systems, especially the MultiBacTM system (used in >1,000 academic and industrial labs), have greatly contributed to multiprotein complex research and emergedas powerful tools for manufacturing complex therapeutic biologics such as antibodies and vaccines.

Sponsor






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